Son of Time

SPITFIRE

No computers. No high tech stuff. The Spitfire statements are built with passion and old school artisanship.

spitfire: NO compromises. Just fearless craftsmanship

Honoring the Spitfire airplane, the watchmakers set out to build a distinctive, exceptional timepiece in design and performance. Crafting the entire watch from scratch, they first built a robust watch case with unique hook design with pusher function and screwed crown. The beating heart is where things get taken up a notch. Not accepting anything less than the very best, the ACE201 timepiece is equipped with a Swiss Sellita SW510 automatic chronograph movement with 27 jewels and a power reserve of 48 hours. An absolute powerhouse, crafted to the finest degree, perfectly matching this uncompromising design statement.

The watch case received special attention to give it the same look and feel as the Spitfire bike. Matching the Son of Time bike seat, watch straps were crafted from Italian, vintage leather and wraps itself around a rubber core that mirrors the tires. On its own it is a thing of beauty, but combined with the bike, it’s out of this world.

On the motorcycle front, the very deep line resulted in technical challenges. The front frame was extended by 20cm, the head tube shortened and all electronics repositioned. The engine and frame were taken from “Eddie 21,” another famous speed machine of VTR Customs. They custom built an extended body fully handcrafted and shaped with a good eye instead of computer 3D sketches and a fire spitting exhaust system. They modelled the body on the instantly recognisable air intake system from the WWII plane and painstakingly crafted the alloy body by hand. The whole lot was dropped along with front forks before adding custom made alloy fairings.

“We faced many challenges we have never thought of. We love what we do though and this touches our hearts, taking something iconic and bringing it into the future. The fact it’s building towards a race ready bike is something we are used to as racers, but making Spitfire race ready is another step,” explains Daniel Weidmann.